Off-by-none: Issue #21

The serverless takeover…

Welcome to Issue #21 of Off-by-none. I hope you’re ready to talk serverless! 😃

Last week we got hands-on and learned how to handle “not-so-scalable” systems in our serverless applications. This week we look at some more ways to scale your serverless apps, highlight some recent innovations, examine how serverless and the cloud is affecting the IT landscape, and so much more.

Lots to get to, so let’s jump right in! 🏊‍♂️

When you’re trying to get your serverless application to scale… 📈

Mikhail Shilkov has a brilliant post titled: Serverless at Scale: Serving StackOverflow-like Traffic. In this post he runs experiments across AWS, GCP, and Azure, to test how serverless functions and blob-storage scales to 1,000 requests per second. The results are quite fascinating.

We often talk about scaling “non-serverless” downstream systems in this newsletter, and Tirumarai Selvan has presented us with another option for Scaling RDBMS for GraphQL backends on serverless. Connection management is an ongoing problem with serverless functions. AWS is working to fix this with their Data API for Aurora Serverless (and of course there’s my serverless-mysql package), but overall, not a bad (albeit, non-serverless) approach.

Paul Johnston has some thoughts on Serverless Compute and Serverless Data. It is an interesting way to compartmentalize serverless applications. Without the proper design, ephemeral compute is certainly limited by the underlying datastore. Designing for scale is the new default, and this is a skill that many developers have never really needed to worry about.

Tim Bray started this thread on Twitter that goes deep into microservices and temporal coupling through synchronous communication. 🤓 I love these types of discussions, especially when Marc Brooker and Sam Newman jump in.

And James Thomas tells us about loosely-coupled serverless functions with Apache Openwhisk. Good read that looks at the difference between triggers and queues and how they can affect the scalability of your severless application. A bit specific to Openwhisk, but I think the general concepts are quite universal.

When people are having way too much fun with custom runtimes… 👩‍💻

Danil Smirnov shows you how to access the latest JavaScript SDK from Lambda functions using Layers. You might think that AWS would keep this updated, but you’d be wrong. I ran into this problem a few times, which means you must package the aws-sdk with your Lambda functions. This way is much better. 👍

The team over at Thundra developed their own Node.js Custom Runtime to let you monitor your Lambda functions without making any changes to your code. We’ve seen this type of use case before, but Thundra went the extra step to show us how they actually built it.

Have you ever wondered how to run Elixir on Lambda? Me neither, but Arjan Molenaar has figured it out for us just in case. Building an Elixir runtime for AWS Lambda gives you a brief overview of his motivations, and ultimately leads you to the GitHub repository if you’d like to try it yourself.

And PHP fans can also rejoice! Bref, a serverless framework for PHP, is incorporating a custom PHP runtime into v0.3. Look forward to better performance, PHP-FPM support, and local development with Docker and AWS SAM.

Where to look for serverless events… 🗓

ServerlessDays Cardiff is coming up on January 30th. Tickets are still available, so if you’re going to be in the area, I’d highly suggest you attend. Can’t go wrong with talks from the likes of Yan Cui, Simona Cotin, the Ian MassinghamSlobodan Stojanović and so many more.

And if you’re state-side, ServerlessDays Boston is coming up on March 12th. We just announced the one and only Charity Majors as our opening keynote speaker. And I’m happy to announce that the, wait for it… legendary Chris Munns from AWS will be giving the closing keynote. The remaining speakers will be announced early next week. This is going to be good. 🙌

If you’re looking for something a bit more remote-friendly, Stackery has some upcoming serverless webinars that you can join. They’ll walk you through how to build your serverless applications without needing to write a bunch of YAML.

Feel like doing some traveling? Thundra put together a great list of Serverless Events You Should Be Aware Of in 2019. I’m going to try and get to a few of these myself.

For those of you that are visual learners… 👀

I stumbled across some videos that Cloud Path had created, and I was impressed with how well-produced they were. In AWS S3 & AWS Lambda Integration, they walk you through setting up an S3 trigger and the code required to process the event. Beginner level stuff, but I’m going to keep my eye on this channel.

Marcia Villalba dropped another re:Invent interview where she’s Talking about testing Serverless applications with Slobodan Stojonovic. Slobodan was our very first Serverless Star at Off-by-none and is an awesome serverless resource.

If you can’t get enough of Marcia, check out her Getting ready for AWS reInvent 2018 vlog series. If you’re thinking about going to re:Invent this year, these videos provide a first hand look at this amazing experience.

CloudFlare workers are a relatively new addition to the serverless ecosystem, and they’re quite passionate about how this type of edge computing could change how applications run. How Serverless Platforms are Changing to Enable New Applications is a talk by Zack Bloom that digs deep into this concept.

What to do if you’ve been ignoring serverless security and user privacy… 🔒

If you thought that you didn’t need to worry about GDPR, think again. It was just reported that France fined Google nearly $57 million for an alleged violation. Now this might just be France being France, or it’s a sign of things to come. If you’re not familiar with GDPR, or you’ve already forgot the requirements, Stripe has a great guide to help you out. C’est la vie. 🇫🇷

Last time I’ll mention this (promise). Ory Segal and I are hosting a Foundations of Lambda Security webinar on January 24, 2019 at 11am ET. It will be packed full of practical serverless security advice including risks associate with AWS Lambda, IAM permissions, governance and regulatory compliance, and scalability.

When you’re looking for innovation in the serverless ecosystem… 🔍

Epsagon continues to make serverless observability easier with the introduction of Trace Search. This is a very cool feature that lets you find and drill down into traces using a bunch of different filters. Plus they have created plug-in packages to make integrating tracing and cleaning up your old Lambda versions much easier.

But serverless observability and tracing is a hot space to be in, and Adam Johnson and the team over at IOpipe has their own long list of accomplishments and future plans. In Auld Lang Servers, Adam outlines IOpipe’s milestones and innovations over the last year. Their product continues to get better and better, giving serverless practitioners plenty of options when choosing an observability tool.

And don’t count out OpenWhisk. Release 0.17.0 (18.01.2019) of the Serverless Framework OpenWhisk plugin was recently released, with added support for concurrent actions, which should speed up your deployments.

When you find out that Google Cloud Functions finally supports Go… 🤷‍♂️

Google announced that Go 1.11 is now a supported language for Google Cloud Functions. You’d think that since they invented it, they might have beat Amazon to the punch. Oh well, at least GCP is still innovating its serverless offerings.

Not to be outdone by AWS’s classic serverless example, Adil H has put together a post showing us how to do Image Resizing with Go and Cloud Functions. Code included.

If you’re looking to push the envelope a bit more, Saurabh Deoras has a great article on combining TensorFlow, Go and Cloud Functions. I like when people experiment with stuff like this, and even though his final solution isn’t ideal, it still works. He even waxes-poetic at the end. #deep

When the zombie apocalypse might not be the apocalypse you need to worry about… 🧟‍♂️

Forrest Brazeal wrote a rather depressing (but necessary) piece about the The Creeping IT Apocalypse. With AWS reportedly working on a secretive low-code/no-code project, there is an entire class of engineers that could get automated out of existence. TLDR; learn to code and keep your skills current.

Along the same lines, James Beswick’s latest post, The cloud skills shortage and the unemployed army of the certified, comes at it from a slightly different angle. Of course IT head counts are dropping because of automation, but James argues it isn’t just about keeping your skills current. It’s about the unreasonable expectation that a single developer must now do the jobs of what used to require several highly-specialized people to do. TLDR; become a coding superstar.

Other people are writing about this trend, perhaps without even realizing it. Nader Dabit gives his take on what it means to do Full-Stack Development in the Era of Serverless Computing“This means you basically have a team of specialized engineers that have built out and iterated on something that you or your team simply could not do alone without investing an impractical number of hours.” I think this type of innovation is great, but don’t get caught watching shadows on the wall, this type of undifferentiated development work is going away. Now look who’s being poetic. 😉

When you really like seeing serverless use cases… 🤗

I think we are all in agreement that CloudWatch is not the best place to be digging into our application logs. There are plenty of options out there, but the team at BBC iPlayer shows us how they put Lambda Logs in ELK. It’s a DIY option, but highly effective for their needs.

This is a bit of an old post, but in How I export, analyze, and resurface my Kindle highlights, Sawyer Hollenshead show us how he created a serverless pipeline that extracted his highlights, analyzed them with NLP, and published them to his site to reflect on what he read. Pretty interesting use case, IMO.

Gavin Lewis shows us How To Build a Serverless CI/CD Pipeline On AWS. There is quite a bit of complexity to his approach, but he has it all laid out for you.

When you’re a big fan of the horror genre… 👹

Henning Jacobs has compiled a list of wonderful Kubernetes Failure Stories for us. He claims that these stories “should make it easier for people dealing with Kubernetes operations… to learn from others and reduce the unknown unknowns of running Kubernetes in production.” I say it’s just another opportunity for serverless fans to say I told you so 😂. But seriously, if you want to take a stab at Kubernetes, this is a good list to get you started (or maybe scare you away).

Corey Quinn recounts a horror story of his own in this Twitter thread. The story of an ambitious young man trying to set up his own infrastructure in a shared datacenter goes horribly awry, hilarity ensues. I remember these days myself, but now that the cloud is here, this type of tragedy can easily be avoided.

Where to go for some more serverless reading… 📚

Chris Feist wrote a post called Making serverless variables work for you to accompany his new serverless-plugin-composed-vars plugin for the Serverless framework. I do this a bit differently, but this looks like a handy plugin.

Migrating a Serverless application backend to the Serverless Framework highlights Tai Nguyen Bui’s journey moving away from the console and into the world of serverless deployment automation.

Speaking of serverless journeys, How I Got Comfortable Building with Serverless highlights how Jun Fritz went from code bootcamp graduate, to Stackery employee, to confident serverless builder in just a few months. There is still much to learn, but it is fascinating how quickly people can get things up and running.

The state of serverless: 6 trends to watch highlights a fairly obvious (IMO) evolution of any new technology. However, I think that betting Knative will drive standardization is a bit off. We can argue about what serverless means all day long, but with CloudFlare workers moving compute to the edge, and AWS loading VMs closer to the metal with Firecracker, I personally see anything that adds more layers of abstraction to ephemeral functions being a step in the wrong direction. Maybe it’s just me.

In Dear Go — Thank You For Teaching Me PHP Was A Waste of My Time, Vern Keenan is pretty harsh about the future prospects of PHP. Not sure I agree with him on that, but he does make some good points about Go potentially becoming the dominant serverless runtime.

And finally, Zac Charles asks, What happens to running threads when a Lambda finishes executing? If you’re interested in the inner workings of Lambda functions and container reuse, give this short article a read.

When you’re curious what AWS has been working on… ☁️

There were a lot of serverless announcements and innovations at AWS over the last few months. If you’re having a hard time keeping up, take a look at Eric Johnson’s full recap: ICYMI: Serverless Q4 2018

The new AWS Backup lets you automate and centrally manage your backups across AWS services. Jerry Hargrove (aka @awsgeek) wasted no time putting together a cloud diagram for you. He’s also got a great one for the new Amazon DocumentDB service as well.

AWS also added S3 as a deployment action provider in CodePipeline. Check out this tutorial to learn how to Create a Pipeline That Uses Amazon S3 as a Deployment Provider. Plenty of cool use cases with this.

Two weeks ago AWS announced that AWS Step Functions would support resource tagging. Now they’re getting their very own Service Level Agreement with three 9s.

And Step Functions isn’t the only one getting SLAs. Amazon announced 99.9% Service Level Agreements for Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose.

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Mikhail Shilkov (@MikhailShilkov). Mikhail is a Microsoft Azure MVP, a frequent conference speaker, and an advocate for all things serverless. His blog is loaded with insanely thorough articles about serverless (and functional programming) that are sure to help you level up your own skills. He mostly focuses on Microsoft, but has articles like this and this that can give you some much needed perspective in the overall serverless ecosystem. And today is his birthday, so Happy Birthday, Mikhail, and thanks for what you do! 🎂🎉🎈

Final Thoughts 🤔

Thank you for all the responses from last week. Everyone that sent me a message said they like the length and that they found it easy to skim and pick out the articles they were interested in. I’m glad you all like it. If you have any other thoughts, I’d be happy to hear them.

I hope you enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. I love hearing your feedback and suggestions, it helps me make this newsletter better. Feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, or how you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

Take care,
Jeremy

Off-by-none: Issue #19

Starting off the new year with a serverless bang… 💥

Welcome to Issue #19 of Off-by-none. I’m so glad you’re here to talk about serverless! 🙌

Last week we reminisced about 2018 and laid out some plans for the new year. This week we’ll sort through all the serverless content that people created over the holiday break. Plus we look at some serverless use cases, share some upcoming webinars, and give you links to plenty of great talks to keep you busy for awhile.

We’ve got a lot to get to today, but before we jump in, I wanted to share that Lambda API v0.10 was released. Lambda API is a lightweight web framework for your serverless applications. It’s open source, fast, free, and now supports seamless integration with ALBs. v0.10 also added support for multi-value headers and query string parameters, plus new method-based middleware and much more. I’d love for you to check it out and send me feedback.

Okay, back to our regularly scheduled program. Here we go! 🚀

When you’d rather just sit back and watch some serverless videos… 🍿

ServerlessDays Milan 2018 released videos of all the talks from their event in October of last year. Lots of really great talks in here from Yan Cui, Ian Massingham, Danilo Poccia, and many more.

Serverless Computing London has also released some additional videos including Mikhail Shilkov’s Performance Tales of Serverless, Nate Taggart’s Rethinking Testing For Serverless, and Guy Podjarny’s Serverless Security: What’s Left To Protect?

Heitor Lessa announced that the second season of Build on Serverless is going to be about “Building a Serverless Airline App from scratch + leading practices applied.” This is a fun (and educational) thing to watch. You can (and should) RSVP on Twitch.

Also, Marcia Villalba released the first video in her Serverless Interviews series which just so happens to feature yours truly. So if you want to see me ramble on about serverless for 15 minutes while admiring the view of the Mirage in the background, this video is for you.

When you want to learn more about serverless security… 🔒

The team over at Protego created a Damn Vulnerable Serverless Application and donated it to OWASP so that you can learn what not to do when building serverless application. You can read more about it here. Now we have this AND the Serverless GOAT project that PureSec donated last month. These are both great resources to see how easily serverless vulnerabilities can be exploited and what to do to protect your application.

If you’re interested in discussing the OWASP Top 10 and how they apply to serverless applications, Ory Segal and I are hosting a Foundations of Lambda Security webinar on January 24, 2019 at 11am ET. Lots on information to cover, plus an interactive Q&A session at the end. Should be fun. 😉

What to do when you’re ready to use Lambda Layers… 🍰

Injecting Chaos to AWS Lambda functions using Lambda Layers by Adrian Hornsby, introduces us to a great use case for Layers. Werner said it best, “Everything fails all the time.” Using Chaos Engineering to test the resiliency of your distributed cloud applications is a great way to ensure that when things do fail, that your application will handle those issues gracefully and minimize the blast radius.

Gojko Adzic and his team created some public layers so you can now use FFmpeg, SOX, Pandoc and RSVG with your AWS Lambda projects. One more thing you don’t have worry about.

And if you want to take a Deep Dive Into Lambda Layers and the Lambda Runtime API, sign up for this webinar hosted by Chris Munns, Principal Developer Advocate at AWS. It’s scheduled for January 31, 2019 at 2pm ET.

When you’re having trouble choosing the right database for your serverless app… ⚖️

Alex DeBrie posted a tweet mentioning Rick Houlihan’s Match Your Workload to the Right Database (DAT301) talk at re:Invent. If you thought his Advanced Design Patterns for DynamoDB (DAT401) talk was amazing, prepare for another mind-blowing experience watching this one. Lots of practical advice to help you choose the right backend for your workload. 🤯

Speaking of DynamoDB, Forrest Brazeal from Trek10 spent his holiday break resurrecting the Northwind database from the annals of MS Access and teaches us how to convert it to NoSQL. From relational DB to single DynamoDB table: a step-by-step exploration is a great guide that shows us both the pros and cons of attempting to move relational workflows to DynamoDB. If you’re thinking about moving to NoSQL, please take a few minutes to read this.

When you’re wondering what AWS has been up to… Δ

AWS announced the Amazon API Gateway Service Level Agreement, which may have you scratching your head thinking, don’t all AWS services have SLAs? Just ask Scott Piper from SummitRoute. He put together an AWS Service Support table that shows just how few AWS services actually have them. Something for the 2019 #AWSwishlist.

The AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio Code project seems to be coming along nicely as well. Whether you just want to try it out, or contribute in some way, it’s pretty cool to see AWS developing more things like this out in the open.

They also keep making strides with Nested Applications. If you’d like to learn more, there is a Nested Applications: Accelerate Serverless Development Using AWS SAM and the AWS Serverless Application Repository webinar scheduled for January 31, 2019.  It’s hosted by James Hood, Sr. Software Dev Engineer at AWS, so you know it’s going to be good.

When you’re looking for some sample serverless use cases… 🔍

I love finding people that are applying serverless to new and interesting use cases. Whether they are solving complex workflows, or just a simple function that accomplishes a single task that makes your life easier, seeing the broad application of serverless is quite fascinating. Here are a few I found this week.

Building a serverless data analytics pipeline by Rodrigo Reis shows us a simple, but effective way to capture a stream of web events. They use an SQS queue and reserved concurrency to help throttle requests to their Elasticsearch cluster, which is both simple, and a great approach at their stage. They’re also smartly using IOpipe for observability.

Blog URL to PDF to Amazon Kindle by Dhaval Nagar outlines a simple app for automatically sending blog posts to a Kindle. There are probably multiple ways that this type of workflow could be used.

Serverless Function to Sync Data from a Database to Google Spreadsheet is another simple workflow that would be perfect for marketing teams, sales, or your billing department. No need to build interfaces for reporting data when there are already tools that people are familiar with.

If you want to get a bit more complex, check out How to build a React chat app with AWS API Gateway WebSockets, Custom Lambda Authorizer. Lots to chew on here, but if you’re heading down the WebSockets path, this is a good resource for you.

When you just want some interesting serverless content… 🤓

Save time and money with AWS Lambda using asynchronous programming by James Beswick provides some great tips for handling synchronous calls in your serverless functions. Also be sure that you Don’t overpay when waiting on remote API calls either.

Mike Vizard predicts the Battle Over Serverless Computing Frameworks to Heat Up in 2019. There is a lot of discussion in this piece about other companies (read: NOT AWS) embracing Knative and other open source “serverless” middleware to power their FaaS solutions. I think this goes to show how popular serverless is becoming and the thrashing that’s going on to catch up with AWS. I’m not sure this is going to play out the way these companies think it will.

There’s a new serverless framework called BAM! I haven’t used it yet, but let’s just add this to the list.

Jerry Hargrove continues to create more Cloud Diagrams & Notes for our viewing pleasure. His AWS Lambda and Aurora Serverless ones are awesome.

Yan Cui shows us how to perform Error Handling in AWS Lambda With Wrappers. He talks about the need for middleware in our serverless applications and how we can use it to capture errors and help us debug our systems.

Speaking of debugging, Hamit Burak Emre over at Thundra shows us how to Debug Your Python Functions Locally. Step-by-step debugging in Lambda functions with breakpoints? Yes, please.

Finally, Slobodan Stojanović, author and serverless wizard, answers the question, “What do you use for scheduling AWS Lambdas?” His answer gives us cron jobs and delayed triggers, all without servers to manage or maintain. 👍

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Farrah Campbell (@FarrahC32). Farrah is the Ecosystems Manager at Stackery, a visual tool for building serverless applications. Farrah has become another positive voice in the serverless community, helping to organize ServerlessDays Portland and other workshops, and an ever present figure at conferences helping to spread the serverless word. She was also recently featured as a Serverless Superhero in How serverless is breaking down barriers in tech. Diversity in tech has always been a challenge, so it’s great to have people like Farrah as part of the serverless community working to make it more inclusive.

Final Thoughts 🤔

Week #1 of 2019 is in the books, and if this is any indication, it is going to be a banner year for the serverless community! There has already been a ton of great serverless content so far, plus Paul Johnston pointed out that there are EIGHT ServerlessDays conferences between now and April 11th. One of which is Boston, so be sure to buy your tickets soon! I know I’m excited.

I hope you enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. Please send me your feedback and suggestions so I can continue to make this newsletter better. Feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, or how you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

Take care,
Jeremy

Off-by-none: Issue #15

It’s all about Layers…

Welcome to Issue #15 of Off-by-none. I’m glad that you could join us. 😀

Last week we recapped re:Invent and took a look at some of the excellent talks and AWS product releases. This week we’ll dig deeper into Lambda Layers and see how people are having a bit of fun with custom runtimes. Plus we’ve got more talks from re:Invent and plenty of other serverless tidbits for your mental ingestion.

Lots to get to, so let’s get started! 🚄

What to do when AWS gives people access to Custom Lambda Runtimes… ⚙️

AWS already took care of C++ and Rust for us, plus some launch partners have already added PHP and Cobol support as well. But it seems that the community is taking advantage of this new feature in a big way.

The team over at The Agile Monkeys added a Haskell runtime. Think about it, a purely functional programming language running pure functions on stateless serverless functions! Okay, maybe that’s a bit much, but if you’re a hardcore functional programmer, you may want to give this a look. 😎

Graham Krizek added Bash support, which is pretty darn cool. He even included executables like aws, scp, git, wget and a whole lot more. Think about all the interesting and powerful use cases this opens up. Just this git support alone adds a number of possibilities. 🤓

Data scientists rejoice! You can now run R on Lambda thanks to this tutorial by Philipp Schirmer. There might be some memory limitations, but overall this looks like a workable solution for all you number crunchers. 📊

There’s also this proof of concept for a Serverless Open Runtime for AWS Lambda. Definitely an interesting concept, especially the language agnostic middlewares piece. Could turn out to be a terrible idea, but definitely something to keep your eye on. 🤷‍♂️

When you want to know how to use AWS Lambda Layers… 🥞

You can certainly build Lambda Layers on your own, but several companies are now providing them as a way for you to easily instrument your code. Epsagon, PureSec, Thundra, DataDog, IOpipe, and more, have all built Layers that you can simply plug in to your existing Lambda functions without modifying your code. That’s pretty easy.

Of course, our friend Paul Johnston has some thoughts on Lambda Layers and Custom Runtimes, including initial thoughts on best practices.

If you’re looking to help influence the future of Lambda Layers, take a look at this RFC on how to handle permissions with LayerVersions in SAM. AWS always appreciates feedback from the community, so feel free to throw your hat in the ring and add your comments. 🎩

When you refuse to believe you’ve watched all the good re:Invent talks… 📺

Not all of these are available to watch, but there is still a ton of amazing re:Invent content out there that you probably missed, even if you were at re:Invent! Here are three more talks that I found to be super interesting.

Inside AWS: Technology Choices for Modern Applications (SRV305)
Tim Bray, a Senior Principal Engineer from AWS, talks us through how AWS dogfoods serverless to power many of their own services. Even API Gateway runs on Lambda. He notes that “capacity planning sucks” and that you should “use serverless whenever possible.” This talk is full of great advice, including ways to “minimize state hydration”, plus some helpful notes on the three integration patterns. Watch the talk

Reddit’s Serverless & Compute Infrastructure at Scale (STP18)
Anand Mariappan & Jesjit Birak from Reddit take us through their latest redesign process and the steps they took to avoid another incident like “the Digg Mass Exodus of 2010.” The overall process was helpful to understand, but their method for scaling their video ingestion system using serverless tech is really interesting. A great lesson for enterprises here, as they built this to run along side their existing monolith. Watch the talk

Close Loops & Opening Minds: How to Take Control of Systems, Big & Small (ARC337)
Colm MacCárthaigh, another Senior Principal Engineer from AWS, lays out ten patterns to use while building control planes for distributed systems. Since all of our serverless applications are distributed, this makes for a really useful guide when building our own applications. Colm dives a bit into control theory, but keeps the advice practical so that you can apply these techniques immediately. Watch the talk

When you’re still debating what database to use with your serverless app… ⚖️

If you plan on using DynamoDB, you may want to look at Alex DeBrie’s DynamoDB On-Demand: When, why and how to use it in your serverless applications. Plus, lots of your burning DynamoDB questions are answered in here.

If you still want to go the relational database route, check out A crash course on Serverless with AWS — Building APIs with Lambda and Aurora Serverless by Adnan Rahić. This is a great post to get you started, I just wish he didn’t use an MySQL ORM. 🤦🏻‍♂️

And speaking of MySQL, I released a new version of serverless-mysql that fixes an ENQUEUE issue. If you’re not familiar with it, this module helps you with Managing MySQL at Serverless Scale.

What to do when you need more serverless content… 🙏

Jon Vines gives us some ideas about Breaking Down the Serverless Monolith. It’s tempting to load up functions with a lot of capabilities as it keeps things “simple” and is familiar to most developers. Some good lessons learned are outlined in this post.

If you’re interested in learning some more best practices, take a look at Five Essential Principles for Developing Lambdas. I think most of these are pretty solid (especially single-purpose lambdas), plus there are some examples, which is quite helpful.

Another great thing about single-purpose functions is that they can be optimized for their specific job. Case in point, don’t overpay when waiting on remote API calls by using the appropriate memory configurations.

For you serverless security buffs, take a look at Ory Segal’s 6 Cloud Security Predictions for 2019. And if you want some hands-on experience, try going through this Serverless Security Workshop. 🔒

When you remember that Microsoft Azure has serverless functions too… ⚡️

Mikhail Shilkov is Making Sense of Azure Durable Functions for you with his new (very detailed) post. Though the title suggests this is all about Microsoft’s solution, there is quite a bit of background on microservices, event-driven applications, serverless function composition and more. Definitely worth the read if you’ve got 20 minutes or so to spare. 📖

Kate Baroni, a Software Architect at Microsoft Azure, shows us how an Azure Function can orchestrate a real-time, serverless, big data pipeline.  Plus, if you’re interested, there are some links to related posts that go into more detail. I love finding interesting use cases like this, but it’s curious to me that Azure is doing complex orchestrations within a single function (with no mention of Durable Functions). This has always been a big anti-pattern with AWS Lambda, but maybe not with Microsoft? 😕

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Simon Wardley (@swardley). Simon invented Wardley Maps, which changes the way we look at strategic planning. You can read all about how it works here (and I suggest you do). Beyond that, Simon is a huge proponent of serverless and has been predicting for quite some time that it is the future of computing. He has a number of brilliant talks about serverless (including ServerlessDays Hamburg and Serverlessconf San Francisco 2018), plus his Twitter feed often contains entertaining back-and-forth arguments as to why serverless adoption is inevitable (see this recent Twitter thread). I’m a big fan of Simon and appreciate the work he is doing to make the case for serverless.

Final Thoughts 🤔

Lambda Layers is exposing serverless computing to a number of new communities, and people have been rushing to add support for all kinds of runtimes and service integrations. A recent report by Gartner identified “serverless computing” as the number one key trend for 2019 and noted that “more than 20 percent of global enterprises will have deployed serverless computing technologies by 2020.”

We are still early in this journey, but as Simon Wardley says, “No more questions on serverless. It’s not an ‘if’ but ‘when’. Get on with learning.” This is sage advice, and what we’re encouraging with this newsletter.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. I love getting your feedback. It is always most welcome and much appreciated. Your suggestions help me make this newsletter better each week. Please feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, and if you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

Go build some amazing serverless apps!

Take care,
Jeremy