Off-by-none: Issue #22

Investing in the future of serverless…

Welcome to Issue #22 of Off-by-none. I’m so happy you’ve joined us this week! 😁

Last week we looked at ways to scale your serverless apps, highlighted some recent innovations, and examined how serverless and the cloud is affecting the IT landscape. This week, we look at some recent investments into the serverless ecosystem, highlight some upcoming events, help you pick the right database for your next project, and share plenty of great serverless resources and reads.

There is so much happening in serverless right now! Let’s get to it. 💥

When you see people jumping on the serverless investment train… 🚂

This past week, Lumigo raised an $8M seed round to help manage serverless operations. I love seeing companies that are focusing on serverless raising money. It means that investors are seeing the value, which means they can see a market for it, which means that more companies will begin to invest in serverless technology, which means more options, which means great adoption, and ultimately, world domination… Okay, maybe I pushed that a bit too far.

Torsten Volk recently posted the Top 10 VC investments in serverless startups in 2018: $33M for Twistlock, $15M for Pulumi, $11M for Solo.io, $7M for Puresec, $10M for Serverless Inc., $5.5M for Stackery, $5M for CloudZero, $4.1M for Epsagon, $2M for IOpipe, and $2M for Protego Labs.

I really hope to see companies like this succeed and continue to push the limits of serverless!

When you’re trying to think of some useful serverless use cases… 🤔

Authentication at Edge with StackPath by Jason Byrne is an interesting look at how his company is attempting to eliminate an extra round trip to authenticate requests.

Centralized Logging System for Lambda Functions walks you through the process Mohamed Labouardy and the team over at Foxintelligence followed to deliver near real-time feed of logs from CloudWatch to ELK.

CloudFetch released an open source project called cloudquery that lets you turn any website to serverless API, including support for single-page applications.

Ricardo Trindade shows us a super simple way to create Slack Notifications via AWS Lambda and SQS. Great example of how you can add serverless to your existing workflows to reduce the complexity of your “serverfull” systems.

Our data lake story: How Woot.com built a serverless data lake on AWS is a great article that shows how Woot.com was able to reduce their operational costs by 90%. Plus, it’s a great use case that you can apply to your business straight away.

When your database selection process is down to eeny meeny Dyna-mo… 🤷‍♂️

You’re not alone. Choosing the right database for your application isn’t always easy. AWS has a great post that shows you How to determine if Amazon DynamoDB is appropriate for your needs, and then plan your migration. DynamoDB is an excellent choice for many different types of workloads, but it’s not right for everything.

If you do choose DynamoDb, getting started with writing interactions can be a bit overwhelming. You might want to check out Begin Data: DynamoDB made ridiculously easy!

Another often confusing concept is figuring out How to calculate a DynamoDB item’s size and consumed capacity. Zac Charles has got you covered in his recent piece.

Sasidhar Sekar from Hotels.com has a great piece about creating Efficient Indexes in DynamoDB. It’s the fifth post their DynamoDB series and definitely worth checking out.

Of course, if you want to push serverless data to the extreme, you can always Analyze and visualize nested JSON data with Amazon Athena and Amazon QuickSight. Mariano Kamp’s piece is incredibly useful.

When serverless observability just keeps getting better… 🕵️‍♀️

Thundra now supports observability for .NET functions. For those of you that thought (or were hoping) that C# was dead, Microsoft has news for you. Azure Functions is gaining a tremendous amount of popularity, and where there’s Microsoft, there’s .NET. Learn more by ready Sarjeel Yusuf’s post about Monitoring .NET Lambda Functions with Thundra.

If you want to learn a bit more about Serverless Observability Fundamentals, check out Christina Wong’s post about Breaking down your options when collecting data from AWS Lambda.

And Epsagon, another amazing observability platform, just released their public changelog. I really like this type of radical transparency, especially when you’re trusting companies like this to support your applications. They also initiated a fun Twitter contest. Export a picture of your architecture from Epsagon and tweet #ThisIsMyEpsagon to win a prize.

When you’re looking for deep thoughts on serverless… 🤓

Julian Friedman has a really interesting post titled What comes after Serverless? In it he argues that there is a “Deployless” future, where we’ll skip passed code repos and staging environments, and essentially just edit code. It might seemed a bit far-fetched, but it is worth a read.

From Servers to Serverless recounts Avner Braverman’s journey through infrastructure and cloud innovation. Interesting read with some good history and insights into why serverless is so powerful.

NoOps in a serverless world is an interesting piece that talks about shifting IT’s focus from operations to outcomes. The authors point out that in a 2018 Deloitte global CIO survey, 69% of respondents identified “process automation and transformation” as the primary focus of their digital agendas. NoOps is still a ways off, but as the authors argue, serverless is a powerful tool for companies to reduce their operational overhead.

Sujith Reddy Komma argues the PRO’s & CON’s of Serverless Architectures. It’s a fairly simple list, but I’ve included it because his “cons” are quickly being solved thanks to observability startups, multi-region deployments and SLAs. And the cost argument is starting to get a bit old (at least to me). Need to figure TCO, not just your services bill.

And speaking of costs, The Great Serverless Cost Debate: Serverless ≠ Costless is a great piece by John Demian that explains the cost benefits of going serverless. He makes the extremely salient point that “Running back-end operations is a business in itself.” For larger companies, this may be fine, but for smaller ones looking for a competitive advantage, it’s probably not a business you want to be in.

If you’re looking for more reasons to go serverless, Ryan Jones from Serverless Guru’s piece, Serverless Impact — Developer Velocity explains how serverless speeds up developers and lets them accelerate the delivery features faster.

Greg Simons also wrote about the added benefits of serverless. In Serverless; it’s more than a FaaS, he outlines a number of reasons why serverless is much more than just hype. Plus, there was a nice mention in there. 👍

9 trends to watch in systems engineering and operations from O’Reilly Media touches on a few interesting topics. They waver on whether Knative will become the standard (I don’t think so), the importance that cloud security will play in both automation and DevOps culture, and, of course, AIOPs, because we don’t have enough buzzwords right now.

They also noted that the “serverless craze is in full swing,” with a growth of over 17% from 2017. Erez Berkner, CEO & co-founder of Lumigo says, “2019 could be serverless’ breakthrough year.”

Of course, security should always be top of mind when deploying services to the public cloud. Serverless And The Evolution In Cloud Security, How FaaS Differs From IaaS is a great piece by Ory Segal from Puresec that will give you a side-by-side look so you know what you’re responsible for.

If you’re looking for some visuals, check out How to Fold a Fitted Sheet by Joe Emison from Monktoberfest 2018. If you don’t take away a higher meaning from it, at least you’ll know how to fold a fitted sheet.

Also, Slobodan Stojanovic was interviewed on the The Serverless Show talking about The Importance of Open Source & Community Involvement. Always love listening to Slobodan.

Finally, The Rise of “No Code” by Ryan Hoover isn’t about serverless, but it makes some interesting points about the people who are becoming makers. Thanks to products that allow “non-developers” to build MVPs (or even full-scale working applications), everyone is becoming a maker. What does this mean and how does it affect an IT world that is already being eaten up by automation? Something to think about.

When you’re looking to up your Lambda Layers game… 🚀

Ever wanted to publish your Docker containers as Lambda Layers? Well, now you can with aws-lambda-container-image-converter. This should open up some people’s imaginations.

Serverless Anything: Using AWS Lambda Layers to build custom runtimes by Ben Ellerby shows you how to use layers to build a custom PHP runtime. Sure, we’ve seen this before, but this piece provides an important reminder: “Don’t forget to terminate your large EC2 instance.” 😉

AWS already created a custom Rust runtime for us, but Doug Tangren took it a step further and built the serverless-rust plugin for the Serverless Framework. Love this type of community support!

Just recently, Gojko Adzic gave us some utility Lambda Layers for FFmpeg, SOX, Pandoc and RSVG. Nathan Glover used them to create Serverless Watermarks. Very cool.

When you’re trying to simplify your serverless development… 👩‍💻

Serverless, Inc. announced the release of Serverless Framework v1.36.3. Lots of enhancements and bug fixes in this one.

Brian Leroux published Introducing Architect 5.0: fully serverless WebSockets. More great updates and, of course, support for WebSockets.

And it seems that more frameworks are emerging everyday. Osiris is a new library for building and deploying serverless web apps on AWS. Haven’t spent much time with it, but give it a look.

I also came across the functional-typescript project, a TypeScript standard for rock-solid serverless functions. Looks pretty interesting.

And Eslam Hefnawy created a project called backend.js. It’s a super light module that lets you import your Lambda functions into the browser as a backend library. Not sure what I’d do with this, but kind of a cool concept.

Where to go to find some great serverless events… ✈️

If you’d like to go sans travel, there are a number of webinars scheduled to up your serverless game.

Nested Applications: Accelerate Serverless Development Using AWS SAM and the AWS Serverless Application Repository is on January 31. This is a good opportunity to learn more about SAM and how to reuse your serverless components.

Trend Micro also has a webinar on the 31st to help you Make Sense of the Cloud, Containers, and Serverless. There are some promises of security principles in there, a topic I’m always interested in.

If you’re in the area, or just feel like taking a trip, Serverless, Inc. is running a Serverless workshop on March 1 in San Francisco. Lots of topics covered in here for the serious serverless professional.

AWS is running a Serverless Solution Provider Day in London on February 12th. There will be three great talks by three great companies: Epsagon, Stackery and Puresec. Definitely worth the visit.

Serverlessconf announced that it is coming to the east coast this fall. Exact location and date to drop in February. 🤞 for Boston. 😉

Serverless Computing London 2019 announced that their call for papers is now open. This was a great conference last year, so no doubt it will be amazing again.

The Serverless Architecture Conference in The Hague, Netherlands is running from April 8th through the 10th. Lots of great speakers, plus yours truly will be giving a talk about Serverless Microservice Patterns for AWS. Definitely looking forward to this one.

And don’t forget ServerlessDays Cardiff, Hamburg, and Austin are all coming up. Plus ServerlessDays Boston will be announcing speakers later today!

When you’re looking for some good serverless tips and tricks… 💡

Tom McLaughlin wrote a post titled, AWS Lambda And Python Boto3: To Bundle Or Not Bundle With Your Function. Quite a bit of research went into finding out that “you should not be using the AWS Lambda runtime’s boto3 and botocore module.” If you’re developing serverless apps with Python, take a few minutes to review this post.

Subscribe SQS to a SNS topic in another AWS account with CloudFormation, and gotchas! is another time-saver provide by Yan Cui. It’s a common pattern to connect to services from other accounts, and configuring it correctly with CloudFormation is with Yan’s help.

Danielle Heberling from Stackery gives us some Chaos Engineering Ideas for Serverless. Unit tests and integration tests are a necessity for serverless applications, but testing failures in distributed systems is a surefire way to make sure your systems are resilient and can handle different types of failures.

When you realize that serverless is much bigger than just AWS… 🤯

The Serverless360 team put together the Top 15 Azure Serverless Blogs of 2018. Lots of interesting posts here.

Doug Stevenson from Google answers Firebase & Google Cloud: What’s different with Cloud Functions?

An introduction to Azure Durable Functions: patterns and best practices is a great introduction to some common patterns that you can use in Azure. Only caveat, the examples are in Java. 😬

Serverless on Google Cloud Platform: an Introduction with Serverless Store gives a bit of background on serverless, event-driven computing and how it all fits together with Google Cloud Platform. There is also a link to download the Serverless Store demo app.

IBM Cloud Functions is raising the memory execution level to 2Gb to better handle Monte Carlo methods, genetic algorithms, map-reduce, and a host of other combinatorial optimization and operations research algorithms that lend themselves to running in a serverless environment.

Getting started with Custom Dockerfiles for Node.js for Serverless Functions will show you how to us the Fn project to build functions that you can run on Kubernetes.

And if you’re looking for better secrets managment, Unifying Secrets for OpenFaaS will point you in the right direction. Hint: don’t check them into source control.

Finally, if you’re interested in doing more serverless computing at the edge, Taking a look at Cloudflare Workers might be worth your time.

When the teams at AWS are forced to listen to “We can’t stop, we won’t stop” by Miley Cyrus on constant repeat… 👩‍🎤

AWS Introduced Python Shell Jobs in AWS Glue. Now you can leverage your Python skills to build things like serverless ETL tasks without learning Apache Spark.

TLS Termination for Network Load Balancers has also been added. Not applicable for serverless yet, but it could just be a matter of time.

The AWS CloudFormation UpdateReplacePolicy Attribute allows you to specify an update policy to delete, retain, or create a snapshot of old resources once the new ones have been created. Handy feature for automated serverless deployments.

The AWS Amplify CLI now supports IAM roles including MFA flows, which is a nice way of adding some extra security to the set up process.

AWS Cloud9 Supports AWS CloudTrail Logging now. So if you’re using that as your IDE, CloudTrail can track configuration changes to your environment.

Amazon Cognito Announces 99.9% Service Level Agreement, which is nice. Serverless authentication out of the box, now with guaranteed uptime.

And if you’re using Elasticsearch to handle analytics or full-text searches, you’ll be happy to hear that Amazon Elasticsearch Service doubles maximum cluster capacity with 200 node cluster support. And they announced support for Elasticsearch 6.4.

Also, be sure to check out Jerry Hargrove’s visual notes for AWS AppSync.

When you’re looking for spirited serverless discussions on Twitter… 🍿

@rakyll had some thoughts on Kubernetes being about “never having to wait for your cloud provider for a feature because you can build it yourself.” Ben Kehoe and some others whole-heartedly disagreed.

Paul Johnston posted that “Relational databases are the swiss army knife of databases”, meaning that there are likely better choices, especially for your serverless projects. The Internet did what the Internet does best and generated a lot of opinions. Very interesting thread.

Not to be outdone by others, I too sparked a heated discussion around Event Injection in your serverless apps. There was some candid feedback, and perhaps my point of “developer responsibility” was lost a bit in my wording. However, even though event injection existed before Lambda wasn’t the point, it’s still something to be aware of, especially those that are new to event-driven architectures.

The good news about the above discussion is that it actually highlighted some confusion around the “47” service integrations that Lambda has. Ajay Nair thought this was “good feedback”, so hopefully we’ll get some better documentation out of it. Silver linings. ☁️

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Brian Leroux (@brianleroux). Brian is the co-founder of @begin, a serverless application platform that promises “Serverless in seconds.” He’s also working on the open-source Architect project, another powerful framework for building and deploying serverless applications. Brian is a regular speaker, blogger, and always welcome voice in the serverless community.

Final Thoughts 🤔

When I first started this newsletter almost six months ago, I was scouring the web each week trying to find interesting and relevant serverless content. Now every week I have to narrow down the list, and there are still over 75 links in this week’s issue alone!

I love serverless, and I love how more and more people are embracing it, experimenting with it, and seeing how it can transform the way they are building applications and their businesses. Erez from Lumingo said 2019 could be the breakout year for serverless. With all this momentum, I think he could be right.

I hope you enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. I love hearing your feedback and suggestions, it helps me make this newsletter better each week. Feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, or how you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

See you next week,
Jeremy

Off-by-none: Issue #21

The serverless takeover…

Welcome to Issue #21 of Off-by-none. I hope you’re ready to talk serverless! 😃

Last week we got hands-on and learned how to handle “not-so-scalable” systems in our serverless applications. This week we look at some more ways to scale your serverless apps, highlight some recent innovations, examine how serverless and the cloud is affecting the IT landscape, and so much more.

Lots to get to, so let’s jump right in! 🏊‍♂️

When you’re trying to get your serverless application to scale… 📈

Mikhail Shilkov has a brilliant post titled: Serverless at Scale: Serving StackOverflow-like Traffic. In this post he runs experiments across AWS, GCP, and Azure, to test how serverless functions and blob-storage scales to 1,000 requests per second. The results are quite fascinating.

We often talk about scaling “non-serverless” downstream systems in this newsletter, and Tirumarai Selvan has presented us with another option for Scaling RDBMS for GraphQL backends on serverless. Connection management is an ongoing problem with serverless functions. AWS is working to fix this with their Data API for Aurora Serverless (and of course there’s my serverless-mysql package), but overall, not a bad (albeit, non-serverless) approach.

Paul Johnston has some thoughts on Serverless Compute and Serverless Data. It is an interesting way to compartmentalize serverless applications. Without the proper design, ephemeral compute is certainly limited by the underlying datastore. Designing for scale is the new default, and this is a skill that many developers have never really needed to worry about.

Tim Bray started this thread on Twitter that goes deep into microservices and temporal coupling through synchronous communication. 🤓 I love these types of discussions, especially when Marc Brooker and Sam Newman jump in.

And James Thomas tells us about loosely-coupled serverless functions with Apache Openwhisk. Good read that looks at the difference between triggers and queues and how they can affect the scalability of your severless application. A bit specific to Openwhisk, but I think the general concepts are quite universal.

When people are having way too much fun with custom runtimes… 👩‍💻

Danil Smirnov shows you how to access the latest JavaScript SDK from Lambda functions using Layers. You might think that AWS would keep this updated, but you’d be wrong. I ran into this problem a few times, which means you must package the aws-sdk with your Lambda functions. This way is much better. 👍

The team over at Thundra developed their own Node.js Custom Runtime to let you monitor your Lambda functions without making any changes to your code. We’ve seen this type of use case before, but Thundra went the extra step to show us how they actually built it.

Have you ever wondered how to run Elixir on Lambda? Me neither, but Arjan Molenaar has figured it out for us just in case. Building an Elixir runtime for AWS Lambda gives you a brief overview of his motivations, and ultimately leads you to the GitHub repository if you’d like to try it yourself.

And PHP fans can also rejoice! Bref, a serverless framework for PHP, is incorporating a custom PHP runtime into v0.3. Look forward to better performance, PHP-FPM support, and local development with Docker and AWS SAM.

Where to look for serverless events… 🗓

ServerlessDays Cardiff is coming up on January 30th. Tickets are still available, so if you’re going to be in the area, I’d highly suggest you attend. Can’t go wrong with talks from the likes of Yan Cui, Simona Cotin, the Ian MassinghamSlobodan Stojanović and so many more.

And if you’re state-side, ServerlessDays Boston is coming up on March 12th. We just announced the one and only Charity Majors as our opening keynote speaker. And I’m happy to announce that the, wait for it… legendary Chris Munns from AWS will be giving the closing keynote. The remaining speakers will be announced early next week. This is going to be good. 🙌

If you’re looking for something a bit more remote-friendly, Stackery has some upcoming serverless webinars that you can join. They’ll walk you through how to build your serverless applications without needing to write a bunch of YAML.

Feel like doing some traveling? Thundra put together a great list of Serverless Events You Should Be Aware Of in 2019. I’m going to try and get to a few of these myself.

For those of you that are visual learners… 👀

I stumbled across some videos that Cloud Path had created, and I was impressed with how well-produced they were. In AWS S3 & AWS Lambda Integration, they walk you through setting up an S3 trigger and the code required to process the event. Beginner level stuff, but I’m going to keep my eye on this channel.

Marcia Villalba dropped another re:Invent interview where she’s Talking about testing Serverless applications with Slobodan Stojonovic. Slobodan was our very first Serverless Star at Off-by-none and is an awesome serverless resource.

If you can’t get enough of Marcia, check out her Getting ready for AWS reInvent 2018 vlog series. If you’re thinking about going to re:Invent this year, these videos provide a first hand look at this amazing experience.

CloudFlare workers are a relatively new addition to the serverless ecosystem, and they’re quite passionate about how this type of edge computing could change how applications run. How Serverless Platforms are Changing to Enable New Applications is a talk by Zack Bloom that digs deep into this concept.

What to do if you’ve been ignoring serverless security and user privacy… 🔒

If you thought that you didn’t need to worry about GDPR, think again. It was just reported that France fined Google nearly $57 million for an alleged violation. Now this might just be France being France, or it’s a sign of things to come. If you’re not familiar with GDPR, or you’ve already forgot the requirements, Stripe has a great guide to help you out. C’est la vie. 🇫🇷

Last time I’ll mention this (promise). Ory Segal and I are hosting a Foundations of Lambda Security webinar on January 24, 2019 at 11am ET. It will be packed full of practical serverless security advice including risks associate with AWS Lambda, IAM permissions, governance and regulatory compliance, and scalability.

When you’re looking for innovation in the serverless ecosystem… 🔍

Epsagon continues to make serverless observability easier with the introduction of Trace Search. This is a very cool feature that lets you find and drill down into traces using a bunch of different filters. Plus they have created plug-in packages to make integrating tracing and cleaning up your old Lambda versions much easier.

But serverless observability and tracing is a hot space to be in, and Adam Johnson and the team over at IOpipe has their own long list of accomplishments and future plans. In Auld Lang Servers, Adam outlines IOpipe’s milestones and innovations over the last year. Their product continues to get better and better, giving serverless practitioners plenty of options when choosing an observability tool.

And don’t count out OpenWhisk. Release 0.17.0 (18.01.2019) of the Serverless Framework OpenWhisk plugin was recently released, with added support for concurrent actions, which should speed up your deployments.

When you find out that Google Cloud Functions finally supports Go… 🤷‍♂️

Google announced that Go 1.11 is now a supported language for Google Cloud Functions. You’d think that since they invented it, they might have beat Amazon to the punch. Oh well, at least GCP is still innovating its serverless offerings.

Not to be outdone by AWS’s classic serverless example, Adil H has put together a post showing us how to do Image Resizing with Go and Cloud Functions. Code included.

If you’re looking to push the envelope a bit more, Saurabh Deoras has a great article on combining TensorFlow, Go and Cloud Functions. I like when people experiment with stuff like this, and even though his final solution isn’t ideal, it still works. He even waxes-poetic at the end. #deep

When the zombie apocalypse might not be the apocalypse you need to worry about… 🧟‍♂️

Forrest Brazeal wrote a rather depressing (but necessary) piece about the The Creeping IT Apocalypse. With AWS reportedly working on a secretive low-code/no-code project, there is an entire class of engineers that could get automated out of existence. TLDR; learn to code and keep your skills current.

Along the same lines, James Beswick’s latest post, The cloud skills shortage and the unemployed army of the certified, comes at it from a slightly different angle. Of course IT head counts are dropping because of automation, but James argues it isn’t just about keeping your skills current. It’s about the unreasonable expectation that a single developer must now do the jobs of what used to require several highly-specialized people to do. TLDR; become a coding superstar.

Other people are writing about this trend, perhaps without even realizing it. Nader Dabit gives his take on what it means to do Full-Stack Development in the Era of Serverless Computing“This means you basically have a team of specialized engineers that have built out and iterated on something that you or your team simply could not do alone without investing an impractical number of hours.” I think this type of innovation is great, but don’t get caught watching shadows on the wall, this type of undifferentiated development work is going away. Now look who’s being poetic. 😉

When you really like seeing serverless use cases… 🤗

I think we are all in agreement that CloudWatch is not the best place to be digging into our application logs. There are plenty of options out there, but the team at BBC iPlayer shows us how they put Lambda Logs in ELK. It’s a DIY option, but highly effective for their needs.

This is a bit of an old post, but in How I export, analyze, and resurface my Kindle highlights, Sawyer Hollenshead show us how he created a serverless pipeline that extracted his highlights, analyzed them with NLP, and published them to his site to reflect on what he read. Pretty interesting use case, IMO.

Gavin Lewis shows us How To Build a Serverless CI/CD Pipeline On AWS. There is quite a bit of complexity to his approach, but he has it all laid out for you.

When you’re a big fan of the horror genre… 👹

Henning Jacobs has compiled a list of wonderful Kubernetes Failure Stories for us. He claims that these stories “should make it easier for people dealing with Kubernetes operations… to learn from others and reduce the unknown unknowns of running Kubernetes in production.” I say it’s just another opportunity for serverless fans to say I told you so 😂. But seriously, if you want to take a stab at Kubernetes, this is a good list to get you started (or maybe scare you away).

Corey Quinn recounts a horror story of his own in this Twitter thread. The story of an ambitious young man trying to set up his own infrastructure in a shared datacenter goes horribly awry, hilarity ensues. I remember these days myself, but now that the cloud is here, this type of tragedy can easily be avoided.

Where to go for some more serverless reading… 📚

Chris Feist wrote a post called Making serverless variables work for you to accompany his new serverless-plugin-composed-vars plugin for the Serverless framework. I do this a bit differently, but this looks like a handy plugin.

Migrating a Serverless application backend to the Serverless Framework highlights Tai Nguyen Bui’s journey moving away from the console and into the world of serverless deployment automation.

Speaking of serverless journeys, How I Got Comfortable Building with Serverless highlights how Jun Fritz went from code bootcamp graduate, to Stackery employee, to confident serverless builder in just a few months. There is still much to learn, but it is fascinating how quickly people can get things up and running.

The state of serverless: 6 trends to watch highlights a fairly obvious (IMO) evolution of any new technology. However, I think that betting Knative will drive standardization is a bit off. We can argue about what serverless means all day long, but with CloudFlare workers moving compute to the edge, and AWS loading VMs closer to the metal with Firecracker, I personally see anything that adds more layers of abstraction to ephemeral functions being a step in the wrong direction. Maybe it’s just me.

In Dear Go — Thank You For Teaching Me PHP Was A Waste of My Time, Vern Keenan is pretty harsh about the future prospects of PHP. Not sure I agree with him on that, but he does make some good points about Go potentially becoming the dominant serverless runtime.

And finally, Zac Charles asks, What happens to running threads when a Lambda finishes executing? If you’re interested in the inner workings of Lambda functions and container reuse, give this short article a read.

When you’re curious what AWS has been working on… ☁️

There were a lot of serverless announcements and innovations at AWS over the last few months. If you’re having a hard time keeping up, take a look at Eric Johnson’s full recap: ICYMI: Serverless Q4 2018

The new AWS Backup lets you automate and centrally manage your backups across AWS services. Jerry Hargrove (aka @awsgeek) wasted no time putting together a cloud diagram for you. He’s also got a great one for the new Amazon DocumentDB service as well.

AWS also added S3 as a deployment action provider in CodePipeline. Check out this tutorial to learn how to Create a Pipeline That Uses Amazon S3 as a Deployment Provider. Plenty of cool use cases with this.

Two weeks ago AWS announced that AWS Step Functions would support resource tagging. Now they’re getting their very own Service Level Agreement with three 9s.

And Step Functions isn’t the only one getting SLAs. Amazon announced 99.9% Service Level Agreements for Amazon Kinesis Data Streams and Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose.

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Mikhail Shilkov (@MikhailShilkov). Mikhail is a Microsoft Azure MVP, a frequent conference speaker, and an advocate for all things serverless. His blog is loaded with insanely thorough articles about serverless (and functional programming) that are sure to help you level up your own skills. He mostly focuses on Microsoft, but has articles like this and this that can give you some much needed perspective in the overall serverless ecosystem. And today is his birthday, so Happy Birthday, Mikhail, and thanks for what you do! 🎂🎉🎈

Final Thoughts 🤔

Thank you for all the responses from last week. Everyone that sent me a message said they like the length and that they found it easy to skim and pick out the articles they were interested in. I’m glad you all like it. If you have any other thoughts, I’d be happy to hear them.

I hope you enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. I love hearing your feedback and suggestions, it helps me make this newsletter better. Feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, or how you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

Take care,
Jeremy

Off-by-none: Issue #12

Leaving on a jet plane (to re:Invent)… ✈️

Welcome to Issue #12 of Off-by-none. I’m glad to see all the new faces here and I can’t wait to meet several of you at re:Invent next week!

Last week we looked at a number of resources for serverless beginners as well as some advanced topics for devs looking to level up. This week we’ll continue to dig deeper and explore more about microservices and step functions, plus we’ll look at how startups can benefit from using serverless.

Before we jump in, I wanted to mention Mark Hinkle’s post that compiles a bunch of serverless survey results. Serverless Adoption by the Numbers is a great overview of the serverless landscape. Some key takeaways include: searches for the term “serverless” have increased 20x in the last 3 years, serverless will overtake containers-as-a-service in 2018, and many companies are leveraging multiple cloud providers. There’s also a list of resources at the end if you want to check out the different surveys. Very encouraging news.

Okay, there is a ton to get to today. Let’s get started! 🤘🏻

What to do when you want to take serverless to the next level… ⛷

Toby Fee from Stackery has a great post that outlines 6 Best Practices for High-Performance Serverless Engineering. Lots of useful tips in here.

A few weeks ago I went to ServerlessNYC and outlined a few key takeaways from Gwen Shapira‘s talk about handling data in serverless applications. Mark Boyd from The New Stack has written a post about her talk that goes into a little more detail. You can watch her talk as well.

Thinking about doing some queue processing with your serverless application? Mikhail Shilkov ran some experiments and documented them in his post From 0 to 1000 Instances: How Serverless Providers Scale Queue Processing. He compares Lambda, Google Cloud Functions and Azure Functions to see how they handle 100,000 messages flooded into a queue. The results are very interesting.

Are you prepared to build a production-ready serverless application? Yan Cui (aka @theburningmonk) has completed his Production-Ready Serverless video course! If you want to get a complete overview of testing, debugging, CI/CD, monitoring, error handling, and more, check out his serverless course.

When you realize the power of Step Functions… 🔌

If you’re still using servers, like Chad Van Wyhe at PCI, you can reduce AWS Costs with Step Functions simply by automating the shutdown and snapshotting of your instances. This is an interesting use case that could be applied to a number of applications.

Paul Swail discovered how to Schedule emails without polling a database using Step Functions. I thought this was quite clever, so I posted the link on Twitter.

Apparently other people thought it was clever as well. 😉 Perhaps this use case was already discovered, but thanks to Paul for documenting it. Plus, there are plenty of applications that would be perfect for. This is most likely going to be my go to strategy for building scheduling services.

When you’re curious what all the fuss is about microservices… 🤓

I’m a huge fan of microservices and have written extensively about them (see here and here, oh and here). So whenever I find content about microservices, I have to take a look. There were a few good resources I came across this week that I wanted to share.

Kyle Galbraith tells us 6 Interesting Things You Need to Know from Creating Serverless Microservices. Kyle is just building a small application, but many of his observations are spot on. I’m not sure I would start by creating separate AWS accounts for each microservice, but it certainly is a valid approach for fine-grained scoping of resource limits plus avoiding other services being noisy neighbors and exhausting concurrent executions.

I recently went down the YouTube rabbit hole when I discovered a talk by Sam Newman from GOTO Berlin earlier this month. Sam Newman is the author of Building Microservices, which is a must read, btw. Anyway, his talk, Insecure Transit – Microservice Security, dives deep into things like the Confused Deputy problem and proposes solutions (like using an internal JSON Web Token to pass context to downstream services). Really good stuff.

I then found a talk he did at GOTO Amsterdam called, Confusion in the Land of Serverless, which is another excellent talk. This ultimately led me to his course: Serverless Fundamentals for Microservices: An Introduction to Core Concepts and Best Practices. I didn’t get a chance to watch this yet, but it looks like a really good, in-depth courses for building microservices with serverless.

When you’re considering what tech to use for your startup… 👨🏻‍💻

James Beswick‘s new post, Serverless for startups — it’s the fastest way to build your technology idea, is a great overview of how serverless can be used to quickly and inexpensively test your product concept. Unless your application needs to do something that serverless can’t do (🤔), there really isn’t a better way to build a greenfield application.

Along the same lines, Necmettin Karakaya wrote a piece that gives you a Full-Stack Serverless MVP recipe for cash-trapped Startups. This might not be the perfect recipe for your use case, but it shows you that there are enough tools and services out there to build your applications without the need to manage servers.

Finally, a while back I wrote a fictional story about two different startup teams. One chose serverless technology, the other did not, and the outcomes are very different. A Tale of Two Teams is a fun read that draws from real experiences that I’ve had over the course of my 20 years spent writing software and building applications.

When you want to get started with serverless… 🚼

New Relic gives us some Tips and Practical Guidance for Getting Started with AWS Lambda. There is plenty of good bits of information in here. Worth the read if you’re new to Lambda and serverless.

It’s amazing how many open source serverless platforms there are. In 7 open source platforms to get started with serverless computing, Daniel Oh lays out a number of popular choices. He also gives a great overview of Knative. Helpful if you’re interested in orchestrating and serving up your own serverless function containers.

When you want to bring serverless workflows to the enterprise… 🏢

Forrest Brazeal and Chris Munns put on a great webinar on Serverless Workflows for the Enterprise. There were some excellent ideas in there for segregating shared services accounts and setting up Dynamic Feature Pipelines. There were also lots of best practices for testing, secrets management, and multi-account security. You can watch the video and download the slides.

You can also listen to Forrest and Jared Short talk about the Future of FaaS  (and Jared’s new role at Serverless, Inc.) on the Think FaaS podcast.

When AWS makes it impossible for you to keep up with their product updates… 🤯

And I thought there were a lot of updates last week! AWS is continuing to pump out new features before re:Invent next week. Below is just a sample of some announcements that make their total serverless offering even better.

Also, Forrest Brazeal noticed this in the CloudFormation schema for AppSync the other day:

Looks like we might be getting RDS HTTP Endpoints after all. #gamechanger 👍

Project Update: Lambda API v0.9 Released 🚀

This past week I finally released Lambda API v0.9. Lambda API v0.9 adds new features to give developers better control over error handling and serialization. A TypeScript declaration file has also been added along with some additional API Gateway inputs that are now available in the REQUEST object. You can contribute to the project on GitHub or install it via npm.

Serverless Star of the Week ⭐️

There is a very long list of people that are doing #ServerlessGood and contributing to the Serverless community. These people deserve recognition for their efforts. So each week, I will mention someone whose recent contribution really stood out to me. I love meeting new people, so if you know someone who deserves recognition, please let me know.

This week’s star is Paul Swail (@paulswail). Paul is a full-stack web developer/cloud architect from Northern Ireland who has a consulting company called, Winter Wind Software. He’s got a great blog about serverless and a weekly newsletter. He also built this handy Lambda Scaling Calculator. Earlier we mentioned his latest article, Schedule emails without polling a database using Step Functions, but it is worth mentioning again. It’s use case ideas like this that help developers and businesses realize the power of serverless. Keep up the great work, Paul!

Final Thoughts 🤔

That was a lot to get through, but I hope you’re encouraged (as I am) by all the progress being made with serverless. Some new patterns are starting to emerge that are expanding use case examples, plus more experiments and tales from developers using it in production are making the case for serverless even stronger. There’s always more to do, plus with re:Invent next week, we’re sure to see a number of great new features.

I’ll be at re:Invent next week, so I look forward to sharing all the things I learn! And please ping me if you want to meet up to chat about serverless or grab a drink. 😀🍻

I hope you’ve enjoyed this issue of Off-by-none. Please send me your feedback and suggestions. They are always welcome and appreciated. It helps me make this newsletter better each week. Please feel free to contact me via Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or email and let me know your thoughts, criticisms, and if you’d like to contribute to Off-by-none.

Now go build some amazing serverless apps! ⚡️

Take care,
Jeremy

P.S. If you liked this newsletter, please share with your friends and coworkers. I’d really appreciate it. Thanks! 😉